Sous vide New York strip steak and fennel salad

Sous vide New York strip steak and fennel salad

Sous vide New York strip steak and fennel salad

Ingredients

  • New York strip steak
  • Iodised salt
  • Queensland nut oil
  • Butter
  • Sherry
  • Cream
  • Fennel
  • Red onion
  • Radish
  • Lime juice
  • Pomegranate arils
  • Coriander
  • Parsley
Sous vide New York strip steak and fennel salad

Instructions

  1. Season the steak with salt.
  2. Vacuum seal the steak and cook in a water bath at 55 °C for 2 hours.
  3. Remove the steak from the bag and empty the juices into a container.
  4. Dry the surfaces of the steak with kitchen paper.
  5. Wipe the cooking surface of a cast-iron skillet with some Queensland nut oil.
  6. Heat a cast-iron skillet until the oil begins to smoke.
  7. Sear the steak on all sides and then add a nudge of butter to the skillet and baste the steak.
  8. Add the meat juices from the vacuum bag.
  9. Remove the steak from the skillet and place on a plate to rest.
  10. Deglaze the skillet with some cooking sherry and add some cream to make a sauce.
  11. Slice the fennel, red onion, and radish with a mandolin (use a safety glove to avoid significant hæmorrhage).
  12. Add the fennel, red onion and radish to a bowl with some lime juice and water to prevent the vegetables from oxidising.
  13. Drain the liquid from the bowl and place the salad vegetables into a salad bowl.
  14. Chop the coriander and parsley and add to the salad bowl.
  15. Add the pomegranate arils to the salad and toss the salad (whatever you do, do not look up toss the salad in the urban dictionary).
  16. Place the steak onto a dinner plate which has been warming on the water bath.
  17. Add the salad next to the steak.
  18. Spoon the sauce from the skillet over the steak.
Sous vide New York strip steak and fennel salad

Spaghetti with creamed spinach and steak

Spaghetti with creamed spinach and eye fillet steak

I carb loaded today, so I figured why not have some more with some spaghetti.

I have great workmates. One friend made croissants yesterday (she’s a butter fiend), and she gave me one fresh out of the oven this morning. Another friend made coconut ice which is one of my all-time favourite confectionaries.

Yes, I’m spoilt.

Songlines coffee with homemade Croissant and homemade Coconut ice

Ingredients

  • Spaghetti
  • Spinach leaves
  • Garlic
  • Dijon mustard
  • Cream
  • Leftover sous vide eye fillet steak (thinly sliced)
  • Cherry tomatoes
  • Leftover caramelised onions
Spaghetti and creamed spinach with leftover eye fillet steak and caramelised onions

Instructions

  • Cook the spaghetti in boiling water for 7 minutes.
  • Drain the spaghetti and rinse with cold water.
  • Put some olive oil in a cold skillet and turn the heat on to a low setting.
  • Add some sliced garlic to the oil and allow it to cook and release its flavour into the warm oil.
  • Add in the spaghetti and begin to warm it up with the caramelised onions.
  • Toss in the spinach leaves and allow the leaves to wilt.
  • Mix through a couple of teaspoons of dijon mustard and some cream.
  • Add in the sliced steak and some cherry tomatoes and keep cooking until the meat is warm.
Spaghetti and creamed spinach with leftover eye fillet steak and caramelised onions

Sous vide eye fillet with lentils à la dijonnaise

I’ve got leftover lentils from last night and steak plus some broccolini—a pretty nice Sunday dinner on a long weekend.

Sous vide eye fillet steak with mashed lentils à la dijonnaise and broccolini

Ingredients

  • Eye fillet steak
  • Iodised salt
  • Black pepper
  • Leftover lentils à la dijonnaise
  • Broccolini
  • Olive oil
Tied up eye fillet steak after cooking sous vide (under pressure)

Instructions

Steak

  • Tie the eye fillet with cooks string.
  • Season the steak with salt and pepper.
  • Seal the steak in a vacuum bag.
  • Cook sous vide (under vacuum) for 2 hours at 55 °C.
  • When finished, remove the steak from the vacuum bag and dry the surfaces with absorbent kitchen paper.
  • Sear the steak in a hot cast-iron skillet using high vapour point oil like Queensland nut oil or rice bran oil.
  • Add a nudge of butter to the skillet and spoon the melting butter over the steak.
  • Allow the steak to rest and then slice thinly with a sharp knife.

Broccolini

  • Wash the broccolini in water and then rub olive oil on the heads.
  • Season the broccolini with salt and then cook in an oven at 200 °C for about 20 minutes.

Leftover lentils à la dijonnaise

Plating up

  • Spoon the lentils onto a dinner plate which has been warming on the water bath.
  • Transfer slices of steak over the lentils and spoon burnt butter over the steak.
  • Place the broccolini next to the steak and lentils.
Sous vide eye fillet steak with mashed lentils à la dijonnaise and broccolini

Lentils à la Dijonnaise (mustard and speck lentils)

You can find the full recipe at Yummy Lummy.

Lentils à la Dijonnaise

Ingredients

  • 300 grams of green lentils
  • 1 litre of tap water
  • One carrot (sliced)
  • One onion (halved)
  • Two cloves
  • One sprig of thyme
  • Two bay leaves
  • One clove of garlic
  • 150 grams of smoked speck
  • Two tablespoons Dijon mustard
  • salt and pepper to season
  • One nudge of butter

Instructions

  • Rinse the lentils in cold water and then put the lentils into the saucepan.
  • Then add the water (three times the volume of lentils, e.g. 900 mL of water to 300 grams of lentils).
  • Bring the water and lentils to the boil.
  • Remove the scum floating on the water with a spoon. I have no idea what difference this does, but apparently, French cooks do this. Not that I care about what French cooks do or think. 
  • Slice the carrot with a sharp knife or a mandolin and be careful not to slice your fingers open.
  • Half the onion with a sharp knife and again be careful. Blood in the lentils may add a little saltiness but is not usually required.
  • Insert a clove into the top of the dome of half of the onion.
  • Add the carrot, onion with the clove in situ, garlic, bay leaves, and thyme.
  • Add the speck,
  • Mix everything so that the water covers everything.
  • Do not salt early, salt after 20 minutes because the lentils will not cook properly (or so they say).
  • Cook for 30 minutes with the lid on with low heat. 
  • After 30 minutes, remove the aromatic vegetables but not the carrot.
  • Remove the speck and pan fry it for the finished dish.
  • Take some of the hot fluid and mix with the dijon mustard to dilute the dijon mustard.
  • Then pour the creamy thin dijon mustard back into the saucepan and gently mix everything. 
  • Serve the lentils in a bowl.
  • Add a nudge of butter. What is a nudge of butter? I have no idea. 
  • Add the speck to the bowl. 
  • Garnish with something green to make it pretty because all TV and YouTube cooks will tell you, “we eat with our eyes”. Now, what a stupid thing to say. I mean, sure you can pour small quantities of a liquid over your eyes to permit the collection of nutrients in your conjunctivæ. The nutrients will travel via capillary action down through the nasolacrimal ducts into your nasal passages where if you swallow hard, you can ‘consume’ the liquid. This approach is hardly an efficient way to eat a bowl of lentils.
  • Add some wholegrain mustard for a contrasting taste and mouthfeel.
  • Add some pepper.

Baked salmon with sauerkraut and apple sauce

I’m guessing you’re wondering what am I doing combining salmon with sauerkraut and apple sauce.

Baked salmon with sauerkraut and apple sauce

On the weekend I bought a jar of sauerkraut and a bottle of apple sauce for a pork knuckle meal. The instructions on the sauerkraut jar read, “eat within a week of opening” so here I am eating salmon and sauerkraut.

Ingredients

  • Salmon
  • Sauerkraut
  • Apple sauce
  • Sweet potato chips

Instructions

  • Cook the sweet potato chips at 200 °C for 30 minutes.
  • Cook the salmon in an oven at 200 °C for 15 minutes.
  • Add a spoonful of sauerkraut and a spoonful of apple sauce to the dinner plate.
Baked salmon with sauerkraut and apple sauce

Spaghetti, creamed spinach, and eye fillet steak

For the first time in many years rather than buying Asian pasta, I bought some European pasta.

Spaghetti with leftover eye fillet steak with spinach, rocket, garlic, dijon mustard, cream, and cherry tomatoes

A simple meal tonight. I need to finish the leftover steak from last week. I also have some spinach left to finish too.

It’s an easy enough meal.

I boiled some water and cooked the spaghetti. After rinsing and draining the spaghetti I out it into a frying pan with some olive oil and butter and tossed it around a bit before adding in the spinach leaves to wilt. Add to the frying pan a dash of cream and a teaspoon of mustard for flavour and Bob’s your uncle. All I needed to do was toss through the thinly sliced steak, and dinner was ready.

Spaghetti with leftover eye fillet steak with spinach, rocket, garlic, dijon mustard, cream, and cherry tomatoes

Pork knuckle, sauerkraut, and apple sauce

Pork knuckle, sauerkraut, and apple sauce

For the full recipe, check out the post at Yummy Lummy.

Coles Australian Pork knuckle
Pork knuckle, sauerkraut, and apple sauce with potato mash and instant gravy

Recipe

Ingredients

  • Slow-cooked Australian pork knuckle
  • Polish sauerkraut
  • Australian grown apple sauce
  • Potato mash
  • Instant gravy

Instructions

  • Turn on the oven and heat it to 220 °C.
  • Remove the pork knuckle from the packaging and dry off the surface with kitchen paper.
  • Put the pork knuckle onto a lined baking sheet with the rind exposed.
  • Cook the pork knuckle for about 50 minutes.
  • Remove the pork knuckle from the oven and allow it to rest.
  • Tear off the crispy crackling and set it aside.
  • Dissect away the cooked muscle meat from the bone.
  • Slice the meat and place it onto a dinner plate.
  • Spoon some sauerkraut onto the dinner plate.
  • Spoon some apple sauce onto the dinner plate.
  • Irradiate the potato mash with microwaves.
  • Place the potato mash onto the dinner plate.
  • Boil some water.
  • Put a tablespoon of instant gravy powder into a glass jug and then whisk through the boiling water.
  • Pour the gravy over the potato mash.

Reverse seared scotch rib fillet steak

The last few weeks I’ve cooked salmon under vacuum (sous vide) on a Sunday night.

This is how I think we should breed cows. Scotch fillet steak with greater deckle meat to eye fillet ratio 🤣
This is how I think we should breed cows. Scotch fillet steak with greater deckle meat to eye fillet ratio 🤣

Yesterday, while grocery shopping I saw a nice thick piece of scotch rib fillet steak and thought it looked too good to go past.

Butter Flour Milk

Tonight I cooked the steak by the reverse sear method. That is, I start cooking the steak in a low-temperature oven and then finished the cooking with a hot but short searing on a cast-iron skillet at the end.

Butter Flour Milk Gorgonzola

I also thought it would be nice to make a blue cheese sauce with some leftover Gorgonzola cheese.

Ingredients

  • Steak
  • Salt
  • Pepper
  • Butter
  • Plain flour
  • Milk
  • Cheese
  • Baby green peas
Butter Flour Gorgonzola Scotch fillet steak

Equipment

  • Toaster oven
  • Cast-iron skillet
  • Saucepan
  • Heat source (I use a portable induction hob)
  • Meat thermometer (I use a wireless one connected to an application on a smart device)
Reverse seared scotch fillet steak with blue cheese sauce and baby green peas
Reverse seared scotch fillet steak with blue cheese sauce and baby green peas

Instructions

Dry brining

  1. Last night, I unwrapped the steak and patted it dry with absorbent kitchen paper.
  2. I put it on a rack over a baking dish and then seasoned all surfaces of the steak with salt.
  3. I put the steak (left uncovered) in the refrigerator overnight and all of today.

Reverse searing the steak

  1. When I was ready to cook dinner, i.e., after a Group FaceTime session with my daughters, I turned on the toaster oven to about 75 °C.
  2. I took the steak out of the refrigerator and inserted the meat thermometer, so the tip of the probe was deep into the fillet portion of the steak.
  3. For readers unfamiliar with the anatomy of a scotch fillet steak, the eye fillet is surrounded in part by the deckle meat which has a fat cap attached. The eye fillet is very tender and is relatively lean, unlike the deckle meat, which is often fatty. Regular readers will know what part of the scotch rib fillet steak I like the best. 😉
  4. I opened the associated application on my smart device and set the desired target temperature to 45 °C.
  5. I put the steak into the toaster oven and then allowed it to cook until the internal temperature had reached 45 °C.
  6. On the application, I followed the progress of the interior and ambient temperatures As the internal temperature approached 45 °C I wiped some Queensland nut oil onto the cold surface of my cast-iron skillet and turned on the heat to high.
  7. When the application signals the internal temperature has reached 45 °C, I turned the toaster oven off and removed the steak. I gently placed the steak onto the hot cast-iron skillet and began searing the surfaces of the steak.
  8. To avoid uneven cooking of the meat, I like to turn the steak over relatively frequently. I also use kitchen tongs to hold the steak and sear the edges of the steak, especially the fat cap, so the fat renders a little.
  9. Once the steak had seared to my liking, I removed the steak from the skillet and put it onto a plate and then brushed it over with some melted butter.
  10. At this stage, I seasoned the steak with freshly cracked black pepper.
  11. I allowed the steak to rest for a few minutes before dissecting away the deckle meat from the fillet. Dissection means inserting your fingers between the spinalis dorsi and the longissimus dorsi muscle bundles and prising them apart. With a cooked steak, the connective tissue plane has dissolved, and the muscle bundles should pull apart with little to no resistance. As the Borg say, “Resistance, is futile.”
  12. I placed the fillet portion into an airtight container and refrigerated it for later in the week.
  13. I sliced the deckle portion for dinner. 
  14. On the dinner plate, smother the steak with blue cheese sauce.
Reverse seared scotch fillet steak with blue cheese sauce and baby green peas
Reverse seared scotch fillet steak with blue cheese sauce and baby green peas

Blue cheese sauce

  1. Weigh 25 grams of butter.
  2. Weigh 25 grams of flour.
  3. Crumble some blue cheese. I chose to use some leftover Gorgonzola cheese.
  4. In a cold saucepan, begin to melt the butter on low heat.
  5. When the butter has melted, add flour and cook the flour in the butter for a few minutes. 
  6. Slowly add some cold milk and stir until it begins to thicken.
  7. Add in the cheese and incorporate with a wooden spoon until the sauce is smooth.
Reverse seared scotch fillet steak with blue cheese sauce and baby green peas
Reverse seared scotch fillet steak with blue cheese sauce and baby green peas

Baby green peas

  1. Rapidly boil some water.
  2. Add in a cup of frozen baby green peas.
  3. Bring the water back to the boil and turn off the heat.
  4. Drain the water from the peas.
Reverse seared scotch fillet steak with blue cheese sauce and baby green peas
Reverse seared scotch fillet steak with blue cheese sauce and baby green peas

Serving up

  1. On a warm dinner plate, add the sliced steak and next to the steak, use a spoon to add the peas.
  2. With a spoon smother the steak with blue cheese sauce.

Tonight was the first time I’ve made a blue cheese sauce. It was a great addition with the steak.

If you make this meal, please let me know. Leave a comment or contact me on social media.

This is how I think we should breed cows. Scotch fillet steak with greater deckle meat to eye fillet ratio 🤣
This is how I think we should breed cows. Scotch fillet steak with greater deckle meat to eye fillet ratio 🤣

Friday night meat-free pizza

It’s Friday night, and that means pizza.


I had some dough in the refrigerator from last week for tonight. When I opened the container, I noticed the dough was more moist than usual, and it also had a bit of a sour, funky sort of smell. It was more like sourdough.

I’m bloody hopeless at shaping pizza dough. Take a look at tonight’s effort. I really need help.

Pizza

Tonight’s toppings included tomato paste, mozzarella cheese, porcini mushrooms, gorgonzola, and basil. I also threw on a few cherry tomatoes.
Check out the apron I wore tonight.

Me wearing a Ford apron
Friday night pizza

Sous vide salmon with Dijon creamed baby green peas

Sous vide salmon with Dijon creamed baby green peas

Sous vide salmon with Dijon creamed baby green peas

Ingredients

  • Salmon
  • Cooking salt (iodised)
  • Baby green peas (frozen)
  • Dijon mustard
  • Cream

Instructions

  • Brine the salmon in ice-cold water with a handful of salt and leave overnight in the refrigerator.
  • Vacuum seal the salmon and then cook sous vide (under vacuum) for 40 minutes at 50 °C.
  • When the salmon is cooked, open the bag and gently peel off the skin.
  • Place the skin on a lined baking sheet and put into a hot oven (240 °C) for about 10 minutes to make the skin crispy.
  • While the salmon skin is cooking, boil some water in a saucepan and then add a cup of frozen baby green peas and bring the water back to the boil.
  • Turn the heat off and wait for the peas to become tender.
  • Drain the peas and put them back into the saucepan and turn the heat back on and add a small knob of butter.
  • Then stir through some Dijon mustard and cream.
  • Serve everything on a dinner plate which has been warming on the water bath.
Sous vide salmon with Dijon creamed baby green peas